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The Jilting Of Granny Weatherall Symbolism Essay Introduction

1 Savelli Blair Savelli Prof. Julia Williams English 112 8 Feb. 2011 Symbols in The Jilting of Granny Weatherall The Bald Eagle, wedding bands, and a red light on a traffic signal may seem very different, but they all have one thing in common; they have a deeper meaning. These are symbols. Symbols are objects or a reference to something that has a more profound meaning than just the word itself. Authors use symbolism to add an ulterior meaning to their stories. In the story The Jilting of Granny Weatherall the author, Katherine Anne Porter, uses blue to symbolize all of the stages in Granny Weatherall’s life. The first instance where blue is used in this story is when Granny thinks back to the days when she ran a tidy and organized household. She thought about the neatness of the “white stone-china jars with blue whirligigs and words painted on them.” (80) The labeling with blue letters on the jar symbolizes Granny’s energy and ability to maintain order in her house and possibly life. In another flashback, Granny remembers her

There are several symbols in Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall." 

A candle, a crucifix, and a rosary are on a table covered with linen (as is an altar) near the bed in which Granny lies. The family has these for Granny as they await the priest who will come to give Granny the last rites, the sacrament of Extreme Unction.These items that symbolize her faith, however, do not...

There are several symbols in Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall." 

A candle, a crucifix, and a rosary are on a table covered with linen (as is an altar) near the bed in which Granny lies. The family has these for Granny as they await the priest who will come to give Granny the last rites, the sacrament of Extreme Unction.
These items that symbolize her faith, however, do not comfort Granny as much as the contact with her loved ones does.

The rosary fell out of [Granny's] hands and Lydia put it back. Jimmy tried to help, their hands fumbled together, and Granny closed two fingers around Jimmy's thumb. Beads wouldn't do, it must be something alive.

Feeling death close at hand, Granny leans over and blows out the light of the candle.

This cake looms in Granny's memory as she cannot forget how she was jilted at the altar on her wedding day. 

As Granny recalls her wedding day, she envisions dark smoke covering a "bright field." The thought of her old fiancé is this "smoky cloud from hell." 

As she remembers this tragic day, Granny imagines "a whirl of dark smoke" (her fiancé) covering a "bright field where everything was planted so carefully." (Granny's plans for her life)

Cornelia's silk lampshades cast a blue light. In reality, however, the blue light that Granny perceives is the light of her life that is fading. For, near the end of the story as she begins to die, Granny imagines the darkness of death circling the blue light and swallowing it:

The blue light from Cornelia's lampshade drew into a tiny point in the center of her brain.

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